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Old 06-09-2021, 02:37 PM   #1
jpc1073
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Default Upgrading cameras

I have started the arduous process of researching new cameras to upgrade from my current Nikon D3300. I mostly use my camera for family vacations / get-togethers and kids sporting events. Currently looking at a D500, primarily because it can shoot 10 FPS. Would pair it with the Tamron 70-200, f2.8. The reason for this post is, should I be considering mirrorless? Lots of options out there and many opinions that mirrorless is the way to go, with DSLR being on the way out.

Thoughts, especially from those who have made the transition from DSLR to mirrorless?

Thanks.
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Old 06-09-2021, 08:48 PM   #2
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I recently upgraded from a DSLR to mirrorless. I was chatting with the photographer who took my daughterís senior pics last fall. He said mirrorless was the way to go, because all of the new tech is geared towards it. Nikonís line of Z mount lenses is what cemented my decision. I usually photograph my sonís lacrosse and football games, so I picked up a Nikkor 70-200 f2.8. Bought a Z5 body, which is the least costly full frame model. The next level up, the Z6, was double the cost. I just couldnít justify spending that kind of money for a casual hobby. Especially given the cost of the lens. I am very happy with my new set up. I would not buy anything but mirrorless, if I were you.
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Old 06-10-2021, 05:20 AM   #3
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I have no input. Over the past 5-6 years, I have pretty much abandoned using my really nice camera and lenses (Nikon) and use my phone. The camera just got to be too much work vs the ease of the phone. Perhaps one day I will get the urge to pull the nice camera back out.
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Old 06-10-2021, 12:39 PM   #4
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DSLR's are dinosaurs. Go mirrorless. I often work with one of the best wedding photographers in the world (literally, he wins awards every year) and he switched from Canon DSLRs to Sony A7iii about a year and a half ago. More and more photographers I work with are switching to either Sony or Canon mirrorless systems.

Do a quick search for "mirrorless" on here. There are a few good threads related to camera gear and technique.
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Old 06-10-2021, 12:44 PM   #5
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Shows how behind the times I am. I knew that film SLRs were a general non-thing, but thought that DSLRs were the current thing. Since I will look to get a nice camera post-retirement for re-igniting a photography bug I had years ago (pre-digital!), this new (to me) technology is good to know about.

Cheers.
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Old 06-11-2021, 02:42 PM   #6
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I switched to mirrorless several years ago shortly after the Sony alpha 6000 series came out. The motivating reason was to shrink the size and weight of my camera gear to make it easier to haul around. I now have an A6000 and a A6500 body with several lenses. At the time I made the move Sony was the clear leader in the technology but by now I would guess the Nikon and Canon have probably caught up. In the last few years like Tom I have been using my camera gear less and my IPhone more so I am not really current on what tech is out there.

The only real negative I have found with the mirrorless technology is that the sensor is exposed when you swap lenses so care must be taken when doing this. I have only had the issue once but it is a pain to try and remove a spot in post processing. The sensor is easy to clean but not really a process that can be done in the field. Now that I have two bodies when I am shooting with the long lens I keep the second body with my wide zoom (17-35MM) on a belt clip (I use peak design ). This way I practically never change lenses in the field.

I always suggest that you spend as much as possible on glass and get the cheapest body that will do the job. The body technology will change quickly but good quality glass will last forever. Personally I splurge and bought Canon L (when I was shooting Canon) and Sony S when I switched to Sony. It is expensive but they have both great optics as well as high build quality. Also if buying native lenses you know that their wonít be any issues with the interface to the body. If not buying native lenses I would suggest reading a lot of reviews to make sure the lens you are buying is of good quality. You can also rent a lens to try it before buying, moist places that rent lenses will sell you the lens they rented to you so that way you know you are getting a good copy of the lens.
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Old 06-11-2021, 02:49 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptJacksFamily View Post

I always suggest that you spend as much as possible on glass and get the cheapest body that will do the job. rented to you so that way you know you are getting a good copy of the lens.
Given what I do for work now, I have become very aware of the idea that nothing can adequately compensate for bad optics. if that part is bad, you're hosed. So, yes, quality lenses are the key.

Cheers.
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Old 06-23-2021, 09:18 AM   #8
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DSLR is disappearing. Definitely look at mirrorless.

Sony has the best auto-focus system and is regarded as one of the best camera manufacturers right now. Canon mirrorless has some fans and detractors.

For family use, I would recommend a Sony a6400 if you don't need IBIS (in-body stabilization) or Sony a6600 if you do. They also do great with video. I loved my Sony a6500 and just sold it on eBay for $650. It also has IBIS and isn't that much behind the a6600 so you could find a used a6500 body for a great price.

For lenses, Sony has some decent "everyday, amateur" lenses and some really good glass for higher prices.

I upgraded to full-frame, the a7iii, which is why I sold my ASP-C body, but ASP-C is excellent.

Fuji has great bodies, sensors, and lenses, but they are more expensive than Sony. I would steer clear of Nikon mirrorless right now.

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Old 07-01-2021, 09:26 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolina_yankee View Post
DSLR is disappearing. Definitely look at mirrorless.

Sony has the best auto-focus system and is regarded as one of the best camera manufacturers right now. Canon mirrorless has some fans and detractors.

For family use, I would recommend a Sony a6400 if you don't need IBIS (in-body stabilization) or Sony a6600 if you do. They also do great with video. I loved my Sony a6500 and just sold it on eBay for $650. It also has IBIS and isn't that much behind the a6600 so you could find a used a6500 body for a great price.

For lenses, Sony has some decent "everyday, amateur" lenses and some really good glass for higher prices.

I upgraded to full-frame, the a7iii, which is why I sold my ASP-C body, but ASP-C is excellent.

Fuji has great bodies, sensors, and lenses, but they are more expensive than Sony. I would steer clear of Nikon mirrorless right now.
Why do you say steer clear of Nikon? I just googled "best mirrorless cameras" and the Nikon Z50 (the one I was recommended) was the top pick and their recommended pick, with Sony at the 6, 8 & 9 spots.
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Old 07-03-2021, 10:54 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpc1073 View Post
Why do you say steer clear of Nikon? I just googled "best mirrorless cameras" and the Nikon Z50 (the one I was recommended) was the top pick and their recommended pick, with Sony at the 6, 8 & 9 spots.
I just saw a list that has Fuji and Olympus in the top slots and Nikon jumping in around #7.

It depends on what you are looking at and talking about with those lists. Sony actually hasn't released an entry level model in the last year or two so their cameras are dropping off the list. At the same time, their auto-focus is the best around and their specs match or exceed nearly everybody. Sony cameras also have extremely good video options (which is why most vloggers use them, whether the a6xxx series or the full frame a7xx series).

Word is they are announcing a new camera this week aimed at vloggers. I don't know much more about it.

From what you described - family and trip photos - a very good ASP-C camera with great autofocus and all the gizmos would be your best bet. Sony fits the bill, and you can find their a6xxx line (a6000, 6100, 6300, 6400, 6500, and 6600) around for very good prices and they are among the best (and most affordable) in that spec and price range. Indeed, they are so good that the a6000, which has been our for years, still has its fans recommending it for basic photography and videography.

If you don't want to buy new glass, your best bet is to find the best Nikon DSLR you can, but it will be a bigger camera and it's not where Nikon is putting their money. While you can use your Nikon glass on a Nikon mirrorless (perhaps with adapters), the lenses aren't designed for those cameras and are bigger than their counterparts that are which kills the benefits of mirrorless.

The Sony a6500 is the first in that series to have in-body stabilization which means you can use any lens with it and get stabilization. The a6600 is its upgrade, but it's also about three years old now. For those who don't need stabilization, the a6400 is the newest model but the a6100 (cheapest entry level) is still the well received. But they are older models, so they aren't on the "best of 2021 list" since newer and shinier have come out.

However, what do you need? Some cameras get top ratings because the monitor swings around so you can see yourself while filming. Do you need to do that? I don't use my mirrorless for selfies, so I don't.

Everybody worries about megapixels and frames per second. I don't shoot sports so I don't need the latest and greatest. 10 fps will basically serve anybody for kids, pets, trips, family, etc. Sony's 24 megapixels is way more than enough for any usage if you aren't making gigantic posters or billboards.

Sony gives what people actually *need* - stellar image quality, stellar autofocus, generally great speeds, compact bodies, excellent lens options from both Sony and third party, etc.

As a company, Nikon is also trying to figure itself out. Just a couple of years ago, there was a question about there ability to be taken seriously anymore. Sony's intent is to be the leader. Canon is going to fight them tooth and nail.

Fuji is outstanding and have awesome retro design, but they are more expensive, and Sony still beats them on autofocus.

I guess, to sum up, the only reason I sold my Sony a6500 was because I was moving to full-frame. If I wasn't moving to full-frame, I had zero need for a new camera because *no new camera* from *any manufacturer* had upgraded any feature that would make their camera more useful or give me a better pic. They are good cameras and last.

I would say, figure out what exactly you need/want in a camera that has an actual impact on your use experience and image quality, and then find the best camera in your budget that fits the bill. But also pay attention to the quality of the glass and what types of lenses you will want. People keep lenses way longer than they keep bodies.

Dirk
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