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Old 02-16-2018, 12:28 AM   #1
attymom23
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Default Help with Touring with Limited Walking ability

I had hip surgery 3 weeks ago and will only be weight bearing 2-3 weeks when we arrive in the World for our Spring Break trip. We almost scrapped the trip but we have too much invested and cannot re-book for another time due to our kids school schedules and activities (and my 15 year old son tugged at my heart strings and reminded me that we only have so many more family vacations together before he is off at college ). So onward we go. The trip was planned long before surgery was planned, and since I was athletic beforehand, I think I may have overestimated what my abilities and endurance would be post surgery.

We will be staying at Beach Club for the first half of our trip and off property in our Marriott timeshare the remaining part of the trip. I am thinking of renting a wheelchair in the parks since I think all the walking and standing will be too much so soon after I am weight bearing again. I really don't think a scooter is for me due to the off property portion of our trip, and the fact that I fear I may run people over.

My concerns are:

1. Getting to the parks, especially during the portion of the trip off property (and we often drive even when on property due to the long waits for buses to MK and AK). I hate to be completely fatigued before we even get through security.

2. Waiting in queues - is there a list which rides wheelchairs can go through the queues? Some rides I will be sitting out (Space mountain, and Dinosaur come to mind due to the jerky motion), but I would rather go through the queue with my family than sit alone for an hour while they wait.

3. Watching the MK fireworks and castle projection show - I fear sitting in a wheelchair with people standing in front of me will not be very fun if I have to stare at someone's backside. I haven't looked yet, but I am not sure if Fastpasses for these are still available, because I am just now coming to the realization that I will have more limitations than I anticipated. Perhaps my family can park me well in advance, but I know from past experience when we would camp out with our kids when they were little and still in a stroller - there were always people showing up at the last minute to try and weasel their way in front of those of us who had been waiting for an hour- or push their children in front of ours and feign lack of understanding English.

Any insight from those who have traveled with walking/standing limitations is much appreciated.
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Old 02-16-2018, 02:40 AM   #2
mustinjourney
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Quote:
Originally Posted by attymom23 View Post
I had hip surgery 3 weeks ago and will only be weight bearing 2-3 weeks when we arrive in the World for our Spring Break trip. We almost scrapped the trip but we have too much invested and cannot re-book for another time due to our kids school schedules and activities (and my 15 year old son tugged at my heart strings and reminded me that we only have so many more family vacations together before he is off at college ). So onward we go. The trip was planned long before surgery was planned, and since I was athletic beforehand, I think I may have overestimated what my abilities and endurance would be post surgery.

We will be staying at Beach Club for the first half of our trip and off property in our Marriott timeshare the remaining part of the trip. I am thinking of renting a wheelchair in the parks since I think all the walking and standing will be too much so soon after I am weight bearing again. I really don't think a scooter is for me due to the off property portion of our trip, and the fact that I fear I may run people over.

My concerns are:

1. Getting to the parks, especially during the portion of the trip off property (and we often drive even when on property due to the long waits for buses to MK and AK). I hate to be completely fatigued before we even get through security.

2. Waiting in queues - is there a list which rides wheelchairs can go through the queues? Some rides I will be sitting out (Space mountain, and Dinosaur come to mind due to the jerky motion), but I would rather go through the queue with my family than sit alone for an hour while they wait.

3. Watching the MK fireworks and castle projection show - I fear sitting in a wheelchair with people standing in front of me will not be very fun if I have to stare at someone's backside. I haven't looked yet, but I am not sure if Fastpasses for these are still available, because I am just now coming to the realization that I will have more limitations than I anticipated. Perhaps my family can park me well in advance, but I know from past experience when we would camp out with our kids when they were little and still in a stroller - there were always people showing up at the last minute to try and weasel their way in front of those of us who had been waiting for an hour- or push their children in front of ours and feign lack of understanding English.

Any insight from those who have traveled with walking/standing limitations is much appreciated.
I would suggest looking into the DAS pass. You’d certainly qualify for it.

I have no idea about ride queues with wheelchair access. Hopefully someone else can chime in. Normally there are separate entrances for most rides.

As far as fireworks, there are no more Fastpasses. You either wait forever or pay for a dessert party.

With a wheelchair, aim for a spot directly behind a railing. That way no one can get right in front of you.

*ETA—looks like I was incorrect about DAS. Didn’t realize that wheelchairs weren’t covered.

Last edited by mustinjourney; 02-16-2018 at 12:46 PM.
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Old 02-16-2018, 04:01 AM   #3
Nickys
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This might be useful from the WDW site, it's a list of all rides that are in the various categories of:
- may remain in wheelchair
- must be ambulatory
- must transfer to ride vehicle
- others where you have to transfer from an ECV to wheelchair first, which suggest you can take your wheelchair through the line or enter through a separate entrance.

https://disneyworld.disney.go.com/en...-disabilities/


Note they won't be able to help you transfer, you or someone in your party must be able to do that.

I don't think mobility issues qualify for DAS, that's for those who can't wait in line. I think now for instance if you can't stand for long periods they suggest a wheelchair instead of the DAS pass which they used to give.

Here's the link to their DAS policy

https://wdpromedia.disney.go.com/med...2015-04-30.pdf


Hope this helps with some of your questions.
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:27 AM   #4
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I would still get the scooter, at least for the BCV portion. The wheelchair involves always a family member pushing it and although I'm sure they have good intentions of doing that, it's harder than you think. Especially when pushing on those slight hills. From experience, harder than one would expect.
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Old 02-16-2018, 08:56 AM   #5
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If your doctor/pt is okay with it, I find a rollator walker ( the kind with the seat on it ) to be far more convenient and comfortable than the scooter. The only place I had a problem with it was Universal and that was probably one employee that was uninformed ( was told could not use it on the queue for MIB because it had built-in basket...)

The rollator fits through all queues and also a place to rest up while still in the queue. Personally, I find it far more useful for long distances than my cane.


Again talk to your Doc first, depending on your injury this may not be an option for you. If it is an option make sure your PT/OT adjusts it to your specific height.
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:13 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by mustinjourney View Post
I would suggest looking into the DAS pass. You’d certainly qualify for it.
Actually you may *not* qualify for it. They are extremely strict about handing it out particularly if it is mobility related. You can certainly try but if a wheel chair or scooter would fix the issue, then you likely will not get it.

Keep in mind with a wheelchair, that you are relying on another to push you all day. Now I'm not a big person (5' and honestly just slightly larger than my 10yo boy) and me pushing someone around all day wouldn't be possible. Granted I have a slew of physical issues stemming from childhood, and I am quite athletic but the idea of pushing someone all day is not great. If you are used to freedom, then this will hinder it as you'll lose a lot of that.

Scooters on property are easy. I have no idea what the transportation where you are staying offsite. I would rent it for sure for BCV. Even that walk up the hill to/from Epcot is a lot for pushing a chair. I would rent through an offsite company for that portion of the stay.

Remember all chairs and scooters are first come first serve. Scooters have a learning curve but helping my aunt with one they are not impossible.

As for wheelchair access, not joking but every ride is different. There are always CMs to guide you. Some have HA accessible queues and some do not. The CM will tell you if you are required to get a return time or go through the regular line or whatever is needed. Some will require transfers and others will not.

The biggest thing to know with all of this is to have patience. It can take more time to maneuver parks and get through lines with any kind of wheels.

Good luck with your recovery. I had a good friend with hip surgery where she was unable to put weight on it for 4 weeks. She did remarkably well with walking after though. My dad also a few months after had hip replacement which I am astounded with his recovery so I wish you the same!
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:44 AM   #7
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I would highly recommend you rent a scooter for your week a Disney.

Robin has had several surgeries over the years because of her car accident. Being that you will only be 2-3 weeks of weight bearing, there is no way you are ready for the parks. Trust me on this.

Robin's last surgery was Nov. 2016. She was non-weight bearing for 2 months, then partial for another month before she could begin physical therapy. By July 4th weekend, she was doing pretty good getting around at home but once we got to Disney, she did not last one full day. I had too order one that evening for the rest of the trip. She did not use it all the time, but 90% of the time she did and it saved our trip.
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:51 AM   #8
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Quote:
1. Getting to the parks, especially during the portion of the trip off property (and we often drive even when on property due to the long waits for buses to MK and AK). I hate to be completely fatigued before we even get through security.
Get a scooter.....The standing is worse then the walking. The buses are very accommodating and you will appreciate it later.

Quote:
2. Waiting in queues - is there a list which rides wheelchairs can go through the queues? Some rides I will be sitting out (Space mountain, and Dinosaur come to mind due to the jerky motion), but I would rather go through the queue with my family than sit alone for an hour while they wait.
Yes there is a list, however must ride ques can handle scooters and chairs, its mostly the older rides/attractions that have to use alternate entrances. Family can go with you thru the line queue.

Quote:
3. Watching the MK fireworks and castle projection show - I fear sitting in a wheelchair with people standing in front of me will not be very fun if I have to stare at someone's backside. I haven't looked yet, but I am not sure if Fastpasses for these are still available, because I am just now coming to the realization that I will have more limitations than I anticipated. Perhaps my family can park me well in advance, but I know from past experience when we would camp out with our kids when they were little and still in a stroller - there were always people showing up at the last minute to try and weasel their way in front of those of us who had been waiting for an hour- or push their children in front of ours and feign lack of understanding English.
There are lots of viewing areas limited to scooters and wheelchairs. The CMs do a good job on keeping sight lines clear. Get there early, coming last minute might shut you out.

The good thing for you, this will be a one off trip and hopefully you will not need a scooter ever again. Do not be embarrassed or feel pressured not to use the scooter. You need to heal and not injury yourself by doing too much. Take your time and experience Disney in a new way for this trip.
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Old 02-16-2018, 09:53 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by helenabear View Post
Remember all chairs and scooters are first come first serve. Scooters have a learning curve but helping my aunt with one they are not impossible.
Go to the grocery store, department store, Home Depot, etc and use their scooters to practice.
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Old 02-16-2018, 10:24 AM   #10
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I am joining in the rent a scooter crowd. At least rent it for the time you are a BCV. I use Best Buy mobility . There are several companies that wdw authorizes . They leave it at the service desk for you before you arrive and pick up before you leave.
I used mobility pride 10

You can rent a collapsable scooter also when you are off property . Or once you move off property you can just rent daily at the park you are visiting . Rent early in the day if you want a daily park scooter. THey do run out .


On lines you can not manage a scooter through wdw provides a wheel chair for you to transfer into . Most of these lines were at MK. Others like safaris you can scooter all the way up to the ride area.


I broke an ankle over 5 years ago now and still can not walk a day in the parks . I only use a scooter at wdw. I also have trouble standing in line.

The das is an option . It basically gives you an extra fast pass or two. You still need to wait in the fast pass line . You go up to the ride they swipe your band and give you a return time. Then you come back after that time and get in the fast pass lane to ride your ride .

It was designed for children with autism . But a cm suggested I get one when they must have thought I looked unstable in a line. I do wobble in crowds a bit. I got it toward the end of the last trip. No trouble getting it . It might prove a nice back up for you. I would avoid stand by lines completely. But you will still stand in the fast pass lines . I noticed the cms keep an eye on you when you use the das. One brought me a chair at the top of the line. If you start to collapse they will help you get out of the line . They can not help you on and off rides technically but they often do . They offer an arm or occasionally just grab yours. I found moving sidewalks the worse. They can slow down the speed of the walkway if you ask. This helps in Peter Pan especially . This is one ride the cm grabbed my arm
And helped me in the ride. If you are having trouble getting out of the low boats they will also help. Pirates, jungle cruise and the boat in the land were hard for me . Other guests also offer an arm if needed .

If you use a walker the cm will move it the end of the ride for you.


I felt awkward using the das. But I plan to use it more this year . No cm gave me the stink eye or seemed to suggest I should not be using it. In fact they seemed glad to know they needed to keep an eye on me. I was often solo.

I saw one person collapse in line from pain apparently. The staff was very kind and quickly came to her aid and helped her get out of the long line .


My main advice is not to over due your park time . Keep your park hours shorter and return to the room to rest if possible. Keep your tylonal or aspirin handy . You will need it. Wdw is exhausting as a rule but if you are in any kind of pain multiply of by 10x.

Just go and enjoy.
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